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Is It True Rats Like Cheese?

In cartoons, there are often mice scenes that are always interested in cheese slices. Is it true that rats like this one?

So far the rat or the cheese shop owner in America thinks that mice do not like cheese at all. In fact, they move away from some kind of cheese, because their very sensitive smell and some kind of cheese emit a smell that keeps them away.

David Holmes, a behavioral animal expert from Manchester Metropolitan University has done research related to the rats favorite on food including cheese. According to him, if really hungry, rats will be any bit like a cardboard and even humans.

“Rats respond to smells, textures, and flavors of food. And cheese is an unavailable thing in their natural environment, and that’s why they do not respond to cheese, “says Holmes.

Most mice love grains, fruits, and sweet foods. Other types of mice prefer insects or small animals. This has become a habit of rats, even long before humans create cheese.


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So, where does the myth of the cheese that became the favorite food of the mouse appear?

Holmes argues that the cartoonists love to draw a hollow cheese equipped with a cute little head and sticking out of the hole. They consider it funny and continue to be used today.

We can see until now that Tom often give Jerry bait to get out of hiding with a piece of cheese.

So, what kind of food does a mouse like and can use to trap? Apparently, rats like peanut butter and chocolate. Sweeter, better. In addition Stephen Turner, one of the managers of Pest Control Shop, a distributor of mousetraps in Europe also argues, that mice of the city fond of hamburgers.

 

Source: http://nationalgeographic.co.id